Monday, November 30, 2009

Time to Schedule Final Exams!

The NCC Library staff welcomes you back from Thanksgiving break. We hope you had a nice holiday!

Today is the first day online students can make an appointment to take their final exams at the NCC Libraries. Be sure to read the following information so that you are able to take your final exam.

Final Exam Week: Important Information!

You MUST schedule an appointment in advance for proctored Online Learning final exams. This includes both paper and computer-based exams.

To schedule your exam at the Bethlehem Main Campus, please phone the Library Testing Center at 610-861-5360 between November 30 and December 13. No appointments will be taken after December 13.

To schedule your exam at the Monroe Campus, please phone the Library at 570-688-2475 between November 30 and December 12. No appointments will be taken after December 12.


Please be ready to give us your Professor’s name and course number when you call.

Schedule early! The sooner you call during the scheduling period, the more likely you will be to get your first choice of appointment date/time. Don’t forget to bring your photo I.D. with you on the day of your exam!

Main Campus Library
November 30 -- December 13: Scheduling Period
December 14 -- December 19: Final Exams
Exam Hours:
December 14 through December 17 -- 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.
December 18 -- 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
December 19 -- 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Monroe Campus Library
November 30 -- December 12: Scheduling Period
December 14 -- December 19: Final Exams
Exam Hours:
December 14 through December 17 -- 8:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
December 18 -- 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
December 19 -- 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

If you are taking courses on campus, click these links to view the Fall 2009 Final Exam schedules: one for Main/LVIP/Southside and one for Monroe/Mt. Pocono. Be sure to note the date, time and room location for each exam, as they may occur at a time that is different from your regular class time.

Best of luck to you during finals! As always, if the Librarians can help you with final research papers, please stop by the Reference Desk for assistance.

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Thanksgiving Holiday Hours

The NCC Libraries will be closed for the Thanksgiving holiday from 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 25 through Sunday, November 29, and will reopen for their regularly scheduled hours on Monday, November 30.

If you're hosting family and friends this year, and need turkey-related advice, the Butterball Turkey company has a help desk staffed with real cooks who can talk you through any preparation situation! Naturally, their phone number is 1-800-Butterball.

And for those who are traveling, whether it's across the country or around the corner, the staff of the NCC Libraries wish you a safe, relaxing and fun Thanksgiving Day. See you on the last day of November!

Monday, November 23, 2009

A Little Slice of Heaven

Thanksgiving dinner just wouldn’t be the same without the traditional slice of pumpkin pie at the end -- and there’s no better breakfast than leftover pie the next morning. But maybe you’d like to spice things up a bit this year, with an exciting new dessert recipe to share with family and friends. The NCC Libraries can help!

Just take a walk down the TX call number aisle of the Stacks, and you’ll find a variety of cookbooks containing recipes for all occasions (and skill levels). The best cookbooks for beginners are those featuring detailed illustrations, so it’s easy to see how your project should look.

Don’t let the idea of making pie crust intimidate you -- the secret is using the proper equipment. Just lay a piece of waxed paper on the counter and dust with flour. Use your rolling pin (or even a clean glass bottle) to flatten out the pastry, starting from the center and pushing out toward the edges, rotating the waxed paper as you go, like spokes on a wheel. When the crust is big enough to cover the inside of the pie plate, slide your hand under the waxed paper and carefully flip the dough into the pan. Gradually peel the waxed paper away from the crust, and trim the edges.

For more cooking tips and delicious recipes, try one of these titles:

The Art and Soul of Baking
by Cindy Mushet
TX 765 .M87 2008 New Books

Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book

TX 714 .N468 2005 Stacks

Bubby's Homemade Pies
by Ron Silver
TX 773 .S497 2007 Stacks

Good Housekeeping Great Baking: 600 Recipes for Cakes, Cookies, Breads, Pies & Pastries
by Susan Westmoreland
TX 763 .G66 1999 Stacks

Joy of Cooking, 75th anniversary edition
by Marion Rombauer Becker
TX 715 .R75 2006 Stacks

Martha Stewart's Baking Handbook
by Martha Stewart
TX 763 .S74 2005 Stacks

The New York Times Dessert Cookbook
by Florence Fabricant
TX 773 .N46 2006 Stacks

Pure Chocolate: Divine Desserts and Sweets
by Fran Bigelow
TX 767 .C5 B49 2004 Stacks

Friday, November 20, 2009

New Leisure Reading Titles

Here are some of the newest titles in our leisure reading collection. Take some time out from the stress of school or work, and enjoy a fun read today! Click on the link to read a review of each book at Amazon.com.




Rainwater by Sandra Brown






Death Masks by Jim Butcher









Scarpetta Factor by Patricia Cornwell









Once In a Blue Moon by Eileen Goudge









Grave Secret by Charlaine Harris








One Simple Act by Debbie Macomber








Rogue Warrior: Seize the Day by Richard Marcinko









Angel Time by Anne Rice










Golden Shrine by Harry Turtledove





There are also quite a few holiday stories to get you in the spirit!



Quilter's Holiday by Jennifer Chiaverini







Christmas List by Richard Paul Evans







Knit the Season by Kate Jacobs








Christmas Cookie Club by Ann Pearlman

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

This Day In History: Margaret Atwood

Today marks the birthday of Canadian author Margaret Atwood. Atwood is a contemporary author, best known for her portrayal of women in her novels. Atwood began her writing career by publishing poetry, then moved on to novels, short story collections and some nonfiction. She is widely studied as a feminist writer.

The NCC Libraries contain Atwood's works, as well as critical analysis. For additional information, be sure to search the Literature Resource Center database.

Works by Margaret Atwood:

The Year of the Flood: A Novel
PR 9199.3 .A8 Y43 2009 New Books section, Main

Moral Disorder: Stories
PR 9199.3 .A8 M66 2006 Stacks, Main and Monroe

Writing With Intent: Essays, Reviews, Personal Prose, 1983-2005
PR 9199.3 .A8 W75 2005 Stacks, Main and Monroe

The Blind Assassin
PR 9199.3 .A8 B55 2000 Stacks

Cat's Eye
PR 9199.3 .A8 C38 1988 Stacks

The Handmaid's Tale
PR 9199.3 .A8 H3 1986 Stacks, Main and Monroe

Works About Atwood:

Margaret Atwood
by Coral Ann Howells
PR 9199.3 .A8 Z695 2005 Stacks

Feminism in Literature: A Gale Critical Companion
by Jessica Bomarito
PN 471 .F43 2005 Reference (6 vols.)

Margaret Atwood: A Critical Companion
by Nathalie Cooke
PR 9199.3 .A8 Z573 2004 Stacks

Margaret Atwood Revisited
by Karen F. Stein
PR 9199.3 .A8 Z896 1999 Stacks

Margaret Atwood: Vision and Forms
by Kathryn VanSpanckeren
E-BOOK (Online)

Works Cited:

"Atwood, Margaret." 2009. Encyclopædia Britannica. Web. 2 Nov. 2009 <http://search.eb.com/eb/article-9011189>.

"“Handmaid’s Tale, The”." Online Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica. Web. 2 Nov. 2009 <http://search.eb.com/eb/art-73063>

Monday, November 16, 2009

Celebrate American Education Week!

Join in the celebration of American Education Week, brought to you by the National Education Association. This event recognizes the importance of public education from kindergarten through college. The NCC Libraries provide tons of books related to education; topics include practical applications, educational theory, hands-on activities for the classroom, equality and access in the educational setting, and much more!

Here is a sample of some of our newest education resources:

The World Is Open: How Web Technology Is Revolutionizing Education
by Curtis Jay Bonk
LB 1044.87 .B66 2009 Stacks, Main and Monroe

Bilingual Education in the 21st Century: A Global Perspective
by Ofelia García
LB 1025 .G37 2009 New Books section, Main and Monroe

Creative Resources for the Early Childhood Classroom
by Judy Herr
LB 1140.4 .H47 2009 Early Childhood Education Collection, Main and Monroe

Emergent Curriculum in Early Childhood Settings: From Theory to Practice
by Susan Stacey
LB 1139.4 .S73 2009 Stacks

A Teacher's Guide to Digital Media in the Classroom
by Richard Harrington
E-BOOK (Online)

Taking Sides: Clashing Views in Early Childhood Education
by Karen Menke Paciorek
LB 1139.25 .T34 2008 Stacks

The NCC Libraries also subscribe to education-related databases and electronic journals (contact a librarian for home access information):


ERIC Education Resource Information Center (access database via EBSCOhost)
The Chronicle of Higher Education (e-journal)
Equity and Excellence in Education (e-journal)
The Future of Children (e-journal)

Friday, November 13, 2009

This Day In History: "Jekyll & Hyde" Author Born on Friday the 13th!


Today we celebrate the birth anniversary of famed author Robert Louis Stevenson (born in 1850). Even if his name doesn't sound familiar, you'll recognize the titles of his novels, such as:

  • The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde;
  • Treasure Island; and
  • Kidnapped.

  • If you're interested in Stevenson's life or adventure stories, do some investigating in the NCC Libraries to find out more:

    The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson
    by Graham Balfour
    PR 5493 .B2 Stacks (2 vols.)

    Treasure Island
    PR 5486 1911 Stacks (also available as an e-book)

    The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
    PR 5485 .A1 1990 Stacks
    PR 5485 .A1 1987 Monroe
    (also available as an e-book)

    New Arabian Nights
    PR 5484 .N5 1968 Stacks (also available as an e-book)

    Kidnapped
    PR 5484 .K5 1949 Stacks (also available as an e-book)

    These titles, and many more by Stevenson, are available as e-books through the NCC Libraries.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009

    Veterans' Day: Honoring Those Who Served

    Today, America honors past and present military veterans: those citizens who have served in some branch of the military and who may have fought in a war. This date is also Armistice Day, which is sometimes referred to as Remembrance Day, when countries around the world agreed to end World War I in 1918. (The agreement happened in the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.)

    The NCC Libraries offer many resources related to veterans, the military and war, including:

    Veterans' Rights and Benefits
    by Margaret C. Jasper
    KF 7745 .J37 2009 Stacks

    After the War Zone: A Practical Guide for Returning Troops and Their Families
    by Laurie B. Slone
    RC 550 .S548 2008 Stacks, Main and Monroe

    Alive Day Memories
    : Home From Iraq (DVD)
    by Ellen Goosenberg Kent

    DS 79.76 .A3924 2007 Media Tower and Monroe


    Ask & Tell: Gay and Lesbian Veterans Speak Out
    by Steve Estes
    UB 418 .G38 E77 2007 Stacks

    The Father of All Things: A Marine, His Son, and the Legacy of Vietnam
    by Tom Bissell
    DS 557 .B57 2007 Stacks, Main and Monroe


    Ground Truth (DVD)
    by Patricia Foulkrod

    DS 79.76 .G7686 2006 Media Tower

    While They're at War: The True Story of American Families on the Homefront
    by Kristin Henderson
    DS 79.76 .H46 2006 Stacks


    Veterans of War, Veterans of Peace
    by Maxine Hong Kingston
    PS 508 .V45 V48 2006 Stacks


    Winter Soldier
    (DVD)
    by Winterfilm and Vietnam Veterans Against the War
    DS 559.2 .W56 2006 Media Tower


    The Things They Carried
    (Audiobook)
    by Tim O'Brien
    PS 3565 .B753 T48 2003 Media Tower

    Home to War: A History of the Vietnam Veterans' Movement
    by Gerald Nicosia
    DS 559.62 .U6 N53 2001 Stacks

    War in the Gulf, 1990-91: The Iraq-Kuwait Conflict and Its Implications
    by Majid Khadduri
    DS 79.72 .K52 2001 Stacks

    Photo credit:

    "Three Servicemen." Online photograph of a bronze sculpture. Ben's Guide to the U.S. Government for Kids. 9 Nov. 2009. http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/symbols/vietnam.html.

    Monday, November 9, 2009

    This Day In History: The Wall Came Tumbling Down


    Today marks the anniversary of the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall in Germany. It doesn't sound like much, right? What is the big deal about a fence coming down?

    After World War II, Germany and its capital were divided and controlled by a number of countries (including the Soviet Union). The eastern portion of the country fell under communist rule, which prompted more than 2 million people to flee to West Germany. In 1961, a wall was constructed to prevent residents of East Berlin (and East Germany in general) from escaping communism by entering West Germany. Defectors risked being arrested or even shot for attempting to cross over the wall.

    In 1989, when the communist leadership of East Germany was removed from power, East Germans were allowed to visit West Germany freely for the first time. Crowds went wild and eventually started chipping away at the wall. By 1990, construction equipment had removed the remaining remnants of the wall and Germany was reunified into one country.

    To learn more about this symbol of the Cold War that divided a nation -- literally and psychologically -- for over 20 years, check out these NCC Library resources:

    The Berlin Wall: A World Divided, 1961-1989
    by Fred Taylor
    DD 881 .T39 2006 Stacks, Main and Monroe

    Germany and the Americas: Culture, Politics, and History
    by Thomas Adam
    E-BOOK (Online)

    The Berlin Wall Crisis: Perspectives on Cold War Alliances
    by John P. S. Gearson
    E-BOOK (Online)

    The Berlin Wall: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and a Showdown in the Heart of Europe
    by Norman Gelb
    DD 881 .G45 1987 Stacks

    For many other books on German culture, World War II, Nazi Germany and more, try searching our Library catalog (SpartaCat).

    Works Consulted:
    "Berlin: Crowd on the Berlin Wall." Online Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica. Web. 19 Oct. 2009 <http://search.eb.com/eb/art-51331>.

    "Germany." 2009. Encyclopædia Britannica. Web. 19 Oct. 2009 <http://search.eb.com/eb/article-58219>

    Friday, November 6, 2009

    It's That Time of the Semester Again!

    Time to start your research, that is.

    With the end of the semester quickly approaching, it is time to start finding research materials for papers, projects and other assignments. Hopefully you've had at least one orientation session at the NCC Libraries, where you learned how to find books and search the periodical databases.

    If you haven't visited the Library or need a refresher on how to do research, you're in luck! The NCC Librarians have been hard at work creating Research Guides, customized Web sites designed to help your research anxiety disappear.

    What kind of information can you find on a Research Guide? Here are some examples:

    • Suggested keywords for specific topics

    • Ideas to help narrow your topic

    • Information on searching for books, including lists of relevant titles

    • Recommendations on the best databases to use for specific subjects

    • Links to reliable Web sites

    • Advice on creating citations

    • Videos that demonstrate how to perform database searches

    ... and much more!

    To take advantage of this collected wisdom, all you need to do is visit our Research Guides home page, and choose a course or topic for which you need information. Courses covered by our Research Guides include:

    • English I
    • English II (Literature Criticism)
    • Speech Communication
    • Dental Hygiene
    • Political Science
    • Medical Terminology
    • Sociology
    • Marketing
    • Stay tuned, there are more Research Guides being added all the time!

    Once you've located the appropriate Research Guide, you can navigate around the site by clicking on various tabs. All of the Research Guides include instructions for contacting an NCC Librarian, so don't hesitate to call or e-mail if you need assistance!

    Best of luck with your end-of-semester research. We look forward to seeing you in the Library!

    Wednesday, November 4, 2009

    This Day In History: Basketball Cracks Up!


    The start of the basketball season is upon us, so here is a little piece of trivia for you: the first shattered backboard occurred way back on November 5, 1946! The excitement didn't happen during a game -- the improperly installed wooden backboard was broken while Chuck Connors of the Boston Celtics was warming up. (Even more trivia: Connors later became an actor and starred in the television series The Rifleman.)

    To celebrate basketball season, check out some of these NCC Library titles:

    Can I Keep My Jersey?: 11 Teams, 5 Countries, and 4 Years In My Life as a Basketball Vagabond
    by Paul Shirley
    GV 884 .S45 A3 2007 Stacks

    On the Shoulders of Giants: My Journey Through the Harlem Renaissance
    by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
    GV 884 .A24 A32 2007 Stacks

    The Physics of Basketball
    by John Joseph Fontanella
    QC 26 .F66 2006 Stacks

    Miracle on 49th Street
    by Mike Lupica
    PZ 7 .L9791 MIR 2006 Children's Literature (Young Adult section)

    Last Dance: Behind the Scenes at the Final Four
    by John Feinstein
    GV 885.49 .N37 F45 2006 Stacks

    Shattering the Glass: The Remarkable History of Women's Basketball
    by Pamela Grundy
    GV 886 .G78 2005 Stacks

    Wilt, 1962: The Night of 100 Points and the Dawn of a New Era
    by Gary M. Pomerantz
    GV 885.7 .P66 2005 Stacks

    Spinning the Globe: The Rise, Fall, and Return to Greatness of the Harlem Globetrotters
    by Ben Green
    GV 885.52 .N38 G73 2005 Stacks

    Information courtesy of:
    "Basketball." Online Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica. Web. Oct. 2009 <http://search.eb.com/eb/art-110152>.

    Chase's Calendar of Events 2009
    . New York: McGraw Hill. 2009. Print.

    Monday, November 2, 2009

    November Is Family Literacy Month

    Yesterday (November 1) was Family Literacy Day, which launches the month-long celebration of Family Literacy Month during November. Literacy is the ability to read and write. Unfortunately, many Americans are illiterate -- unable to read, or with reading skills at a low level. Take a moment this month to appreciate literacy with your family, by reading a book together, looking over the daily newspaper or making up your own stories. For more information on literacy, borrow some of these books from the NCC Libraries:

    Literacy for Young Children: A Guide for Early Childhood Educators

    by Priscilla L. Griffith
    LB 1140.5 .L3 L58 2008 Stacks, Main and Monroe

    Partners in Literacy: Schools and Libraries Building Communities Through Technology
    by Sondra Cuban
    LB 1028.3 .C813 2007 Stacks

    Literacy Development of Students in Urban Schools: Research and Policy

    by James Flood
    LC 151 .L4821 2005 Stacks

    What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy
    by James Paul Gee
    GV 1469.3 .G44 2004 Stacks

    How to Get Your Child to Love Reading
    by Esme Raji Codell
    Z 1037 .A1 C58 2003 Stacks

    The Young Child's Memory for Words: Developing First and Second Language and Literacy
    by Daniel R. Meier
    P 118.7 .M45 2004 Stacks

    Image credit:
    Johnson, J. Seward. "No Mommy, That One!" Photograph of bronze sculpture. Smithsonian Institution Research Information System, Art Inventories Catalog. 28 Oct. 2009. http://siris-artinventories.si.edu/.